Heat Injury Prevention

As an association we strive to keep you up-to-date on relevant information for your business. Please review the information below from Shaun Kelly of CALSAGA Preferred Broker Tolman & Wiker.

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It’s that time of the year again… Heat Illness Prevention season!

With the change in seasons comes the warmer weather and it is imperative (And required by Cal/OSHA) that all employers train their supervisors and employees on heat illness prevention. The safety of your employees is the responsibility of the employer and if an unfortunate event does occur, Cal/OSHA may be investigating the event. If so, they will be asking if you have your Heat Illness Prevention Program in place. The investigation will include verification that you have provided training to your supervisors and employees.

A Cal/OSHA study identified the key role that employers play in preventing worker fatalities due to heat illness. The findings highlighted the value of training supervisors so that they can make the fullest use of their power to control safety on the job.

California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 3395 Heat Illness Prevention requires all employers to have a Heat Illness Prevention Program which includes the following:

Provide fresh/potable drinking water 
Employers must provide employees with fresh, pure, and suitably cool water, free of charge. Enough water must be provided for each employee to drink at least one quart, or four 8-ounce glasses, per hour and the water must be located as close as practicable to the work area. Employers are also required to encourage employees to drink water frequently

Provide access to shade 
When temperatures exceed 80 degrees, employees must be provided shade at all times in an area that is ventilated, cooled, or open to air and that is as close as practicable to the work area. There must be sufficient space provided in the shade to accommodate all employees taking rest. When temperatures do not exceed 80 degrees, employees must be provided timely access to shade upon request. Employees should be allowed and encouraged to take preventative cool-down rest as needed, for at least 5 minutes per rest needed.

Have high heat procedures in place 
High heat procedures are required of agricultural employers when temperatures exceed 95 degrees. The procedures must provide for the maintenance of effective communication with supervisors at all times, observance of employees for symptoms of heat illness, procedures for calling for emergency medical services, reminders for employees to drink water, pre-shift meetings to review heat procedures and the encouragement of employees to drink plenty of water and take preventative cool-down rest as needed.

Agricultural employers must additionally ensure employees take, at a minimum, one 10-minute preventative cool-down rest period every two hours in periods of high heat.

Allow for acclimatization 
New employees or those newly assigned to a high heat area must be closely observed for the first 14 days of their assignment. All employees must be observed for signs of heat illness during heat waves. A “heat wave” is any day where the temperature predicted is at least 80 degrees and 10 degrees higher than the average high daily temperature the preceding 5 days.

Train all employees regarding heat illness prevention Employees must be trained regarding the risk factors of heat illness and the employers’ procedures and obligations for complying with the Cal/OSHA requirements for heat illness prevention. Supervisors must additionally be trained regarding their obligations under the heat illness prevention plan and how to monitor weather reports and how to respond to heat warnings.

Have emergency response procedures 
Employers must have sufficient emergency response procedures to ensure employees exhibiting signs of heat illness are monitored and emergency medical services are called if necessary.

Have a Heat Illness Prevention Plan 
Employers must have a written heat illness prevention plan that includes, at a minimum, the procedures for access to shade and water, high heat procedures, emergency response procedures, and acclimatization methods and procedures.

Download a sample Heat Illness Prevention Plan

With all of the constant changes and updates required by CalOSHA compliance, if you do not have a dedicated Safety Manager, Tolman & Wiker highly recommends hiring a Safety Consultant to make it easier on you to stay current. Tolman & Wiker has worked with EEAP/Got Safety for many years to customize Safety Plans and keep clients compliant, especially lately with COVID-19. At this time, EEAP/Got Safety has partnered with Tolman & Wiker to provide CALSAGA clients with a reduced rate which is very reasonable. Please let them know that Tolman & Wiker referred you and they will take care of you.

EEAP/Got Safety
Rick Rohmann, Operations Manager
Cell: 661-433-7063 – (Preferred Contact Method)
Office: 800-734-3574 Ext #102
Direct & Fax: 435-708-0014
www.gotsafety.com

Be safe and call Tolman & Wiker if you need assistance!

Shaun KellySr. VP, Risk Advisor
Tolman & Wiker Insurance Services
(661) 616-4712

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